Community groups, Environment, News, Stories

Over 100 people clean-up Bruny coast

The waterways of stunning Bruny Island are cleaner thanks to the efforts of the 114 volunteers and the D’Entrecasteaux and Huon Collaboration (DHC) partners who joined a marine debris clean up event last Saturday 25 May, removing over 10 cubic metres of debris. Organised by the DHC, these annual clean-ups

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Community groups, News, Stories

Huon Marine Debris Clean-up

On Saturday 11th May 2019 the D’Entrecasteaux and Huon Collaboration, hosted by NRM South, held one of its most exciting events of the year - the Huon Marine Debris Clean-up. The magnificent coastline of Charlotte Cove, Garden Island and surrounds are cleaner thanks to the efforts of the 82 incredible

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Stories, Uncategorized

Join our Bruny Marine Debris Clean-up, 25th May 2019

Plastic in our ocean increases by 8 million tonnes each year! This durable debris has the potential to entangle, or be ingested by fish, mammals and birds and leach toxic compounds into the ecosystem. Let’s do something about it! Over the last three years, our marine debris clean-ups have removed

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e-news, Environment, Featured, News, Stories

Celebrating World Wetlands Day 2019

The 2nd February marks the anniversary of the signing of the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Convention) in Iran 1971. All over the country seminars, nature walks, festivals and tours are run to raise public awareness of wetland values, benefits and promote the conservation and wise use of

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Stories

Restoration of forestry sites

Norske Skog Boyer and NRM South met on the 19 December 2018 to discuss how they can team up to support sustainable forestry practices in southern Tasmania. Norske Skog Boyer have a commitment to reducing environmental impacts through sustainable practices, including the restoration of old forestry sites. Norske Skog Boyer

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Stories

Help our local handfish

Handfish walk with their “hands” rather than swim. They belong to a group of coastal anglerfish with a narrow distribution in southeastern Australia. There are 14 species with seven endemic to Tasmania and Bass Strait. Handfishes don’t have a planktonic stage, they lay eggs, and have parental care of eggs.

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